News

One Year After Sandy

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013
Today marks the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City shares the incredible progress made through public-private partnerships in the below press release. Achievements include: the allocation of more than $60 Million in relief funds, over 15,000 volunteers engaged, 4 million meals served and almost 3,000 homeowners provided with counseling. Read the full press release and see how you can help Full Press Release Here

NFWF Honors New Jersey Gov. Christie and Conservationist Louis Bacon

Monday, September 30th, 2013
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and leading conservationist Louis Bacon were honored by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) at its 10th annual “Celebrating the Great Outdoors” benefit September 28 in Connecticut. They were awarded the Chairman’s Leadership Award, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s highest accolade, which recognizes significant conservation leadership. Previous recipients include Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, Tom Brokaw, Clint Eastwood, Paul Newman, Harrison Ford, Paul Volcker, The Honorable Ken Salazar, Ken Hofmann, Julie Packard, Stephen D. Bechtel, Jr. and Family, James C. Morgan and Bob Fisher. Both men were selected for their ongoing efforts to preserve and protect threatened landscapes that provide essential wildlife habitat. “National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is extremely pleased to recognize the achievements of these two leaders,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. “They have, and are making significant contributions to the survival of some of our most iconic species, and show an outstanding commitment to conservation action.” NFWF protects and restores America’s wildlife and habitats and works hand-in-hand with conservation efforts abroad. Chartered by the US Congress in 1984, NFWF directs public conservation dollars to pressing environmental needs and matches those investments with private contributions. Honoree Gov. Christie earned national attention for his dedication to rebuild New Jersey’s battered coast following the devastation by super storm Sandy in October 2012. The storm was particularly catastrophic in the United States’ mid-Atlantic, with loss of life, destruction of property and infrastructure, and widespread ecological damage. Honoree Louis Bacon was honored by NFWF for his conservation accomplishments spanning more than two decades. For more than 20 years Bacon’s Moore Charitable Foundation has supported more than 200 nonprofit organizations focusing on land and water conservation, including NFWF. Paul Tudor Jones said when introducing the evening’s honoree, “Louis Bacon has always known that the most we can ever do is be a worthy steward of the land for ourselves and future generations. I have known Louis Bacon for decades. Quite simply, Louis Bacon is one of the best friends the conservation movement has ever had.” Bacon, through his Moore Charitable Foundation, has been a long-standing partner of NFWF’s Long Island Sound Bird Conservation Program. That program focuses on preserving critical habitat along the Atlantic Flyway, protecting species like the Piping Plover and Least Tern which summer on those beaches and winter in The Bahamas. The Moore Charitable Foundation and more recently, its Bahamas affiliate, The Moore Bahamas Foundation, have made significant contributions not only to conservation but also to learn to swim, scholarship, education, medical, and historic organizations in the Bahamas. In 2013, The Moore Bahamas Foundation sponsored innovative conservation positions at Bahamas National Trust and BREEF. It is currently supporting BNT’s ‘Conchservation’ coordinator who is working to preserve conch populations — the pride of Bahamian culinary culture. Through a grant to the Bahamas Reef Environment Education Foundation (BREEF), the organization is able to increase summer programs for teachers and students with “in-the-classroom” and “in-the-water experiences,” building greater awareness of the importance of fragile coral reefs and the marine life that depends upon their survival. The Moore Bahamas Foundation recently sponsored a forum focused on protection of Nassau grouper with BNT and noted marine biologist and underwater artist Dr. Guy Harvey. The annual benefit event included dignitaries such as former Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, the 2011 honoree of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and true to its style, the conservation celebrities dressed the part — in blue jeans. View Original Article

VIDEO: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Establishment of Science & Resilliance Institute at Jamaica Bay

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013
“I wanted to thank some of the people who have been crucial to the success of this partnership…We also thank the private sector and philanthropic partners whose generosity is helping make those efforts possible and that includes Louis Bacon and Ann Colley of Moore Charitable” -Mayor Bloomberg on the Establishment of Science & Resilliance Institute at Jamaica Bay, NY

Secretary Jewell Celebrates Progress of Urban Parks Agreement, Resilience Work with City of New York

Monday, August 12th, 2013
Bloomberg, Jewell announce establishment of new Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay; As Part of President’s Climate Action Plan, Donovan, Jewell Announce Details of $100 Million Grant Competition to Build Coastal Resilience 08/12/2013 QUEENS, N.Y. – Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Director of the National Park Service Jonathan B. Jarvis today to announce the establishment of a new Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay with a consortium led by the City University of New York (CUNY). The Institute will serve as a top tier research center to promote understanding of resilience in the urban ecosystem, and is the product of a partnership between the National Park Service and the City of New York to cooperatively manage 10,000 acres of federal and city-owned parks at Jamaica Bay in Brooklyn and Queens. “In the City of New York, we have a powerful and dedicated partner to promote visitation, education programs, scientific research and opportunities for recreation in our urban parks,” said Jewell. “And now, in CUNY and their academic partners, we have a consortium of world class institutions to advance our understanding of climate change and its impact on our natural systems. Working together, we will develop and coordinate approaches to coastal resiliency for Jamaica Bay that can serve as a model for communities around the world threatened by climate change.” The Institute, which will start on the campus of Brooklyn College, will host visiting scientists, provide lab facilities for students and researchers, and convene events to share and disseminate research findings. The Institute’s first undertaking will be an October symposium, Urban Resilience in an Era of Climate Change: Global Input for Local Solutions. Jointly planned by NYC Parks, NYC Department of Environmental Protection, the National Park Service, CUNY, and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the symposium will highlight global and local expertise around urban resilience. “Cutting-edge science is essential for understanding and managing the precious resources of the Jamaica Bay ecosystem and surrounding communities,” Director Jarvis said. “The Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay – with its stellar consortium of the region’s top-flight scientific institutions – will advance the role of science in managing resources and building regional resilience to future storms. And it is a model of how local scientific expertise can be marshaled to solve big problems, and to provide managers – like those of us in the National Park Service – with usable knowledge.” Jamaica Bay continues to be a focus of the President’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative which is expanding outdoor recreation opportunities, restoring urban natural resources, strengthening outreach programs for school children, improving connections among existing parks, and restoring public access to natural, cultural, and historic resources. Jewell and Bloomberg were also joined by HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, Chair of the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, to announce that the Interior Department has selected the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to administer the $100 million Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resiliency Competitive Grant Program. As called for in the President’s Climate Action Plan, the competition will fund projects that promote resilient natural systems while enhancing green spaces and wildlife habitat in needed areas along the Sandy-impacted landscape, enabling coastal communities and key habitats to withstand the impacts of future storms. “Today’s announcements are directly in line with several of the principles at the heart of the Task Force’s work, including the emphasis on resilience, the need for a regional approach to rebuilding and consistent engagement with academic, non-profit and philanthropic organizations,” said Donovan. “These innovative steps will serve as models for communities across the region and the country as they prepare for impacts of climate change and help them build in a way that makes them stronger, more economically competitive and better able to withstand future storms.” “It’s critical that this funding be allocated wisely and with most impact possible so that communities can rebuild stronger and better able to withstand the next storm,” said Jewell. “NFWF has a strong track record, and I look forward to working with them on this open competition that will attract and inspire innovative ideas to promote coastal resilience and enhance our nation’s natural defense systems.” The grants will fund projects throughout the region affected by Hurricane Sandy to research, restore and rebuild wetlands, beaches and other natural features that protect densely-populated coastal areas, and will safeguard communities, species and ecosystems from future storm damage. “With our partners at the Department of the Interior and its Bureaus, we will work to restore natural resiliency in the states devastated by Hurricane Sandy,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. “We will make sure these funds are used effectively, efficiently and transparently to help ecosystems recover and to protect coastal ecosystems and populations from future storms.” NFWF will help Interior conduct outreach and workshops to develop a strategic program that aligns with ongoing state, city, local and federal efforts. NFWF will work to leverage the $100 million with other funding sources to better rebuild, restore and research natural defense systems. Projects in areas eligible to receive funding include: Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia. The Department’s Executive Council will select projects for funding based on criteria and a process developed by Interior’s Strategic Sciences Group and project evaluation conducted by a panel of federal technical experts. NFWF will not select grant recipients. The program criteria will incorporate infrastructure resilience guidelines recommended by Secretary Donovan’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force. View original article

Mayor Bloomberg and Secretary Jewell Announce Agreement on New Science and Resilience Institute as Part of Cooperative Management of 10,000 Acres of City, Federal Parks in and Around Jamaica Bay

Monday, August 12th, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 12, 2013 Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced progress on their cooperative management of 10,000 acres of federal and city-owned parks in and around Jamaica Bay – namely, the selection of a consortium led by the City University of New York to lead a new Science and Resilience Institute. The Institute will be a top-tier research center promoting an understanding of resilience in urban ecosystems and their adjacent communities through an intensive research program focused on the restoration of Jamaica Bay. They also announced progress on several other initiatives outlined under the management agreement, reached in July of 2012 between the National Park Service and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, including the formation of a Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy. The Mayor and Secretary Jewell made the announcement at Riis Landing on the Rockaway Peninsula and were also joined by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, CUNY Acting Chancellor William Kelly and Peter Madonia, COO of the Rockefeller Foundation. “Jamaica Bay is one of the greatest natural treasures any city has within its borders, and our Administration is working hard to make the bay an even greater, stronger, and more resilient natural resource for decades to come,” said Mayor Bloomberg. “The new consortium we’re announcing today is an all-star team of research institutions and non-profits who will do important work to protect and preserve urban ecosystems from development and from the effects of climate change.” “In the City of New York, we have a powerful and dedicated partner to promote visitation, education programs, scientific research and opportunities for recreation in our urban parks,” said Jewell. “And now, in CUNY and their academic partners, we have a consortium of world-class institutions to advance our understanding of climate change and its impact on our natural systems. Working together, we will develop and coordinate approaches to coastal resiliency for Jamaica Bay that can serve as a model for communities around the world threatened by climate change.” “Cutting-edge science is essential for understanding and managing the precious resources of the Jamaica Bay ecosystem and surrounding communities,” Director Jarvis said. “The Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay – with its stellar consortium of the region’s top-flight scientific institutions – will advance the role of science in managing resources and building regional resilience to future storms. And it is a model of how local scientific expertise can be marshaled to solve big problems, and to provide managers – like those of us in the National Park Service – with usable knowledge.” “Since the signing of last year’s historic cooperative management agreement, NYC Parks has been proud to partner with the National Park Service to further our vision for a revitalized Jamaica Bay and Rockaway Parks,” said NYC Parks Commissioner Veronica M. White. “Even before Hurricane Sandy devastated our region, plans were in place to further resiliency efforts here at America’s great urban park. The new Science and Resilience Institute, with its CUNY-led consortium, will be a model for cutting-edge research. The creation of a beach grass nursery, establishment of a community partnership, presence of hard-working Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Restoration Corps employees, and addition of new concessions, will not only help Jamaica Bay and Rockaway Parks recover from Sandy but also establish it as a premier destination for New Yorkers and visitors.” “Today’s announcements are directly in line with several of the principles at the heart of the Task Force’s work, including the emphasis on resilience, the need for a regional approach to rebuilding and consistent engagement with academic, non-profit and philanthropic organizations,” said Secretary Donovan. “These innovative steps will serve as models for communities across the region and the country as they prepare for impacts of climate change and help them build in a way that makes them stronger, more economically competitive and better able to withstand future storms.” “CUNY is proud to lead a consortium of world-class institutions in the new Science and Resilience Institute,” CUNY Interim Chancellor William P. Kelly said. “Together with our distinguished partners, we will engage in a groundbreaking effort to revitalize the Jamaica Bay ecosystem. This will include extensive research to enhance our understanding of the ecosystem and its resilience, and the coordination and implementation of a comprehensive revitalization and restoration program for Jamaica Bay and the entire watershed.” “The Jamaica Bay Science and Resilience Institute will play a central role in advancing many of the 257 initiatives laid out in A Stronger, More Resilient New York, the City’s comprehensive climate change resiliency plan, which the Mayor released in June,” said Daniel Zarrilli, Director of Resiliency for the City of New York. “The City’s resiliency plan was developed based on the best available scientific knowledge and research. I look forward to collaborating with both global and local experts as we build on that foundation of science to protect New Yorkers and make the City a more sustainable place to live.” The new Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay establishes a top tier research center to promote the understanding of resilience in the urban ecosystem and adjacent communities. The Institute will develop a framework and programs in partnership with academic institutions, non-profits, the community and the many other entities and public agencies actively engaged in research in and around Jamaica Bay including NYC Parks, the National Park Service the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The consortium, which is under development and led by the City University of New York, includes many of the area’s most robust research universities as well as key local institutions: Columbia University’s Earth Institute and its Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Cornell University, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York Sea Grant, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University, Stevens Institute of Technology, Stony Brook University, and the Wildlife Conservation Society. To help realize the City and NPS’s vision for a revitalized, restored Jamaica Bay, the Institute will integrate cutting-edge [...]